University Transfer

Start your degree today. 

Get into University Transfer offered at our Cold Lake, Lac La Biche, and St. Paul campuses and get started on your Bachelor degree. Every course offered at Portage College is transferable to full-degree programs at other post-secondary institutions across the province and country. Attend as a full-time or part-time student, and choose from a wide selection of university courses offered face-to-face and online. Working with a Student Advisor, you can build your program to suit the plans you have for your future and get started right here at Portage College.

Admission Requirements:

High School Matriculation: Completion of high school matriculation subject group requirements, or equivalent, with a minimum average-of-60% and no mark in a matriculation subject group below 50% In:
- English 30 or 30-1,
- Math 30-1 or 30-2, Math 30, Math 30 Pure or Applied, or Math 33
- Social 30 or Social 30-1
- A fourth and fifth subject from other approved five credit Grade 12 courses. Satisfaction of this requirement can include Biology 30, Chemistry 30, Physics 30, Science 30, Physical Education 30, Advanced CTS courses at the 30 level or a 30 level language other than English. Special Projects 30 or Work Experience 30 are not accepted. Students may not use two subjects from the same discipline (e.g. Social 33, if Social 30 or Social 30-1 1 has already been used).

Mature Student: 19 years of age or older, out of high school for at least one full year, and a minimum average of 60% with at least 50% in English 30 or English 30-1 and one other five credit Grade 12 course.

Open Studies Admission: Completion of twelve credits with a minimum GPA of 2.0 and consent of the Portage College registrar.

Advisor Assisted Admission: Students who do not meet other admission requirements are encouraged to discuss options for admission into the University Studies program with a Portage College advisor.

Important Links: 

University Transfer Fall Schedule

University Transfer Information Guide

Transfer Alberta 

Fall & Winter Course Listing

  • ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Course ID: PSYC285

    Name: ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides an overview of a variety of abnormal behaviours that are psychologically oriented. The characteristics and observable symptoms of psychological disorders are studied including various theoretical orientations, treatment methods, cultural, age and gender differences, and various factors related to the incidence of mental disorders. The learning in this course adds to the knowledge students acquired in Introductory Psychology and, for CSW students, Developmental Psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 104 and PSYC 202, or PSYC 105

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART I

    Course ID: ARTH101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is an introduction to the history of visual arts and design from the earliest evidence to the fourteenth century. The concentration will be on the history of art in the Near East and Europe: Western Art. Since there has been contact between these areas and the Indian sub-continent and the Far East, and since these have been influences on the later history of Western Art, the art of Asian cultures during this period will also be briefly considered. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO CELL BIOLOGY

    Course ID: BIOL101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO CELL BIOLOGY

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    This course focuses on the structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Major topics include the movement of energy, matter and information within and among cells. Key concepts such as cell theory and structure, energy transformations, reproduction, genetic variability, molecular genetics and applications in biotechnology are covered. PREREQUISITES: 60% in ELA 30-1 and 60% in BIO 30

  • COMMUNICATIONS FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

    Course ID: COMM135

    Name: COMMUNICATIONS FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course explores basic and therapeutic communication skills for the health professional. Communication skills required for the development of caring relationships and to overcome barriers will be discussed, as well as, the skills needed for interprofessional practice, group and family communication. Conflict resolution, self-reflective practice and health teaching are key components of this course. PREREQUISITE: Admission to a Health & Wellness program

  • INTRODUCTORY COMPOSITION

    Course ID: ENGL102

    Name: INTRODUCTORY COMPOSITION

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course helps students to develop the academic writing skills they use throughout their university studies. Students learn to identify good writing, and develop needed research, analytical, and organizational skills. Starting with building good sentences and paragraphs, the essay is the most important genre in this course. By analyzing, summarizing, synthesizing, and critiquing a variety of texts, students learn how to develop their own analyses and arguments with appropriate and correctly documented primary and secondary sources. A review of grammar and sentence structure is a key component of this course. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY I

    Course ID: CHEM101

    Name: INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY I

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    CHEM 101 is an Introductory Chemistry course. It may be referred to as Introductory University Chemistry. This course is designed for both Chemistry majors and non-majors. Key concepts include atomic and molecular structures, states of matter and chemistry of the elements. This course includes a laboratory component designed to provide experience in experimental techniques and accurate measurement. The course prerequisite is a basic knowledge of chemistry equivalent to the Alberta’s Chemistry 30 high school curriculum. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1 and 60% in CHEM 30

  • HUMAN ANATOMY

    Course ID: BIOL230

    Name: HUMAN ANATOMY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides an in-depth study of the structures of the human body and their interrelationships using a systems approach. The correlations between structure (anatomy) and function (physiology) are examined. Major topics include body organization, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, endocrine, urinary and reproductive systems, the general and special senses, and human development. This course is designed to prepare students in medical fields of study for advanced courses in their respective fields, as well as other university transfer students. PREREQUISITES: 60% in BIO 30 and 60% in ENG 30, BIOL 231

  • INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA & TO POETRY

    Course ID: ENGL106

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA & TO POETRY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    English 106 is designed to teach critical writing, critical reading, and critical thinking while studying canonical literary texts from the sixteenth to the twenty-first centuries. This course combines the study of literary works with instructional texts to teach students to express themselves more clearly in writing and in speech. The creators of this course also hope that students develop an appreciation for fine literary works. This course will present plays and poems from a variety of historical periods and from a variety of cultural contexts. Particular emphasis will be placed on the development of correct writing style, rhetorical skills, and thinking skills required for academic study. A minimum of thirty percent of class time will be devoted to writing instruction, which may take any or all of the following forms: grammar and punctuation instruction, informal writing exercises, writing workshops, stylistic and rhetorical analysis, research skills, peer editing, and group writing projects. The total amount of writing will be no less than 3,000 words. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

    Course ID: SOCI101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to introduce students to the discipline of Sociology and current sociological trends and issues. The course provides an overview of sociological concepts, perspectives, processes and institutions in a Canadian context with particular emphasis on various issues impacting Canadian society. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE PROFESSION OF TEACHING

    Course ID: EDUC250

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE PROFESSION OF TEACHING

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course introduces prospective teachers to the complexity of their future professional roles in today’s schools. Students will be encouraged to consider teaching from “the other side of the desk”, and will leave familiar with the intricate framework in which teachers work, and the expectations of various stakeholders. They will gain a knowledge base on which future Education courses will build, and will be introduced to theories of learning and teaching. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

    Course ID: PSYC101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is a general survey course providing the student with an understanding of the basic concepts and techniques of modern psychology as a behavioural science. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

    Course ID: ORGB193

    Name: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    Organizational Behaviour is the study of what people think, feel and do in and around organizations. Organizational Behaviour is not just for managers; the concepts explored in this course are useful to anyone who works. This course builds student knowledge starting at an individual level, moving on to a team level, and finally finishing at the organizational level. Students will develop an understanding of how Organizational Behaviour concepts affect themselves and others, and how those impact the organization's bottom line. Prerequisites: English 30, English 30-1, English 30-2, or English 33

  • PERSONAL HEALTH & WELLNESS

    Course ID: HEED105

    Name: PERSONAL HEALTH & WELLNESS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course will introduce you to the physical, social, mental, occupational, emotional, environmental and spiritual dimensions of personal health and wellness. These dimensions are described within the context of the Canadian Health Care System and your own individual community. Topics include primary health care, nutrition, exercise, stress management, weight management, eating disorders, common health issues and their prevention. You will be expected to integrate knowledge of the seven dimensions of health and apply this knowledge to a self-analysis of your own health and physical fitness. Finally, you will incorporate change management theory to develop, implement and evaluate a personal wellness plan. The intent of this course is to promote a healthy lifestyle. By examining determinants of health, the current health care system, the seven dimensions of health and applying these concepts to your own lifestyle, you will be better equipped to function as role models and act as change agents for health promotion in your community. Prerequisites: 60% in ENG 30-1

  • PHYSIOLOGY I

    Course ID: BIOL231

    Name: PHYSIOLOGY I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides a study of the overall function of the human body. Major topics include fundamental chemistry, homeostasis, cytology and cell physiology, cell signaling and communication, and muscle, nervous, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, endocrine, urinary and reproductive physiology, as well as fundamental genetics as it applies to human physiology. This course is designed to prepare students in medical fields of study for advanced courses in their respective fields, as well as other university transfer students. PREREQUISITES: 60% in BIO 30 and 60% in ENG 30-1, BIOL 230

  • RACE & RACISM IN THE MODERN WORLD

    Course ID: ANTH103

    Name: RACE & RACISM IN THE MODERN WORLD

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course gives an anthropological perspective on how the concept of race has been used to understand biological and cultural variation among humans. Issues and topics discussed will include multiculturalism, ethnic identity, prejudice, ethnocentrism, racism, eugenics and the persistence of ethnic identity in the face of globalization. Case studies from different parts of the world are used to illustrate these concepts, including current issues of interest in Canada. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • THE EARLY MODERN WORLD

    Course ID: HIST101

    Name: THE EARLY MODERN WORLD

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    History 101 is intended to introduce students both to the content of early modern world history and to the study of history at the university level. In content, the course traces the development of the world from around 1400 to around 1800. As with any history, the focus of the classes and readings is selective; we cannot hope to cover every society and nation in equal depth, but must attempt to negotiate a balance between specific historical detail and broad themes. In the process, students will be expected to develop and utilise skills needed for history as an academic discipline, such as the ability to remember when things happened and how they fit together, the ability to read historical texts carefully and to ask questions of those texts, and the ability to express themselves clearly and coherently in writing. Ideally, students should come away from this course not simply knowing “facts,” but equipped to think historically about the world in which we live, and armed with skills of critical analysis and expression that they will find applicable to many areas of endeavour aside from history. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • BRAIN & BEHAVIOUR

    Course ID: PSYC275

    Name: BRAIN & BEHAVIOUR

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the area of biological psychology. Its focus is on the scientific study of the biological bases of human and animal behaviour with a biological approach to the study of psychology. Topics that will be covered in this course include: evolution, neuroanatomy and neurophysiology – the study of the structure and functions and activities of the nervous system, neuropharmacology – the study of the effects of drugs on neural activity, the physiological mechanisms involved in sensation, perception, movement, motivation, emotion, learning, and communication. Prerequisites: PSYC 104 and 60% in BIO 30

  • DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Course ID: PSYC202

    Name: DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course explores the development of the person through the stages of infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and death. Each stage of human development will be studied from a physical, cognitive, and psychosocial perspective. The course will include developmental influences related to family systems and culture. Prerequisites: PSYC104

  • DRAMATIC PROCESS I

    Course ID: DRMA101

    Name: DRAMATIC PROCESS I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    An introduction to the process of acting and dramatic form through the process of improvisation. This workshop-based course will explore speech and movement improvisation with an emphasis on imaginative development and introduction to the process of acting and to dramatic form. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ENG 30-1

  • EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY FOR TEACHING

    Course ID: EDPY200

    Name: EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY FOR TEACHING

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course examines the psychology of learning and instruction. The theoretical basis of human development, learning, and teaching will each be explored, providing a comprehensive background to the art of education and effective teaching. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • COMMUNICATIONS FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

    Course ID: COMM135

    Name: COMMUNICATIONS FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course explores basic and therapeutic communication skills for the health professional. Communication skills required for the development of caring relationships and to overcome barriers will be discussed, as well as, the skills needed for interprofessional practice, group and family communication. Conflict resolution, self-reflective practice and health teaching are key components of this course. PREREQUISITE: Admission to a Health & Wellness program

  • INDIVIDUAL & SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR

    Course ID: PSYC105

    Name: INDIVIDUAL & SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is the second half of the Introductory Psychology course sequence. It will cover such topics as human intellect, human development from birth to old age, motivation, emotion, personality, social psychological processes, stress and health, as well as mental disorders and their treatments. This course is an overview of these diverse topics, most of which can be studied in one or more complete courses. Prerequisites: PSYC104

  • INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS I

    Course ID: MATH100

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course serves as an introduction to the methods and applications of single variable calculus. Limits are used to investigate continuity and asymptotes, as well as define the processes of differentiation and integration in a precise manner. Students learn to calculate, interpret, and apply derivatives and integrals to solve rate of change problems and to accurately depict the behavior of a function. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1 and 60% in MATH 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

    Course ID: SOCI101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to introduce students to the discipline of Sociology and current sociological trends and issues. The course provides an overview of sociological concepts, perspectives, processes and institutions in a Canadian context with particular emphasis on various issues impacting Canadian society. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE NOVEL & THE SHORT STORY

    Course ID: ENGL108

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE NOVEL & THE SHORT STORY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    English 108 is designed to teach critical writing, critical reading, and critical thinking while studying canonical literary texts from the eighteenth to the twentieth-first centuries. This course combines the study of literary works with instructional texts to teach students to express themselves more clearly in writing and in speech. The creators of this course also hope that students develop an appreciation for fine literary works. This course will present novels and short stories from a variety of historical periods, and from a variety of cultural contexts. Particular emphasis will be place of the development of correct writing style, rhetorical skills, and thinking skills required for academic study. A minimum of thirty percent of class time will be devoted to writing instruction, which may take any or all of the following forms: formal written assignments, informal writing exercises, writing workshops, stylistic and rhetorical analysis, research skills, peer editing, group writing projects, and ungraded writing. Students will write two formal essays that will be graded, including an analytical and a research paper. The total amount of writing will be no less than 3,000 words. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or other 3 credit junior English

  • INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY II

    Course ID: CHEM102

    Name: INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY II

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    CHEM 102 is the second Introductory Chemistry course, following CHEM 101. Therefore, CHEM 101 is the prerequisite course. Major topics include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, thermodynamics, coordination chemistry and electrochemistry. Key concepts such as reaction rates, rate laws, Arrhenius equation, reaction mechanism and catalysis will be discussed. The course will also present gas-phase equilibria, ICE table and equilibrium calculations, acid-base and complex ion equilibria, solubility and precipitation. In addition, second and third laws of thermodynamics, entropy and spontaneity, coordination compounds, crystal field theory as applied to colour and magnetic properties of coordination compounds, voltaic cells, cell potentials, free energy, electrical work, Nernst equation, batteries, corrosion and electrolysis will be covered. Prerequisite – CHEM 101.

  • INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY

    Course ID: PSYC104

    Name: INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is a prerequisite to other psychology courses at Portage College and is normally followed by PSYC 105. (However, PSYC 105 is not a requirement in the CSW program.) This course is intended to inspire an interest in, and an appreciation for, the field of psychology. Topics in this course include the history of psychological science, psychological research methods, the structure and function of the brain and nervous system, learning, sensation, perception, memory, consciousness, thought and language. Prerequisites: 60% in ENG 30-1

  • MARKETING

    Course ID: MARK166

    Name: MARKETING

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    This is an introductory course covering the fundamental principles and concepts of marketing. Major emphasis is placed on the marketing mix and its strategic application to an increasingly complex business environment. In particular, the areas of product, promotion, price, and distribution are examined as they relate to the achievement of company objectives. Prerequisites: English 30, English 30-1, English 30-2, or English 33 or COMM 121

  • HISTORY OF THE NATIVE PEOPLES OF CANADA TO 1867

    Course ID: HIST368

    Name: HISTORY OF THE NATIVE PEOPLES OF CANADA TO 1867

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    History 368 is a lecture and seminar course that examines the history of the indigenous peoples of Canada prior to and at the moment of first contact with European peoples. In order to gain a full perspective of this critical time period in the North American history, students examine a variety of oral and written documents produced by First Nations, Métis, Aboriginal, and Inuit peoples as well as European explorers, traders and settlers. A combination of lectures and seminar groups are used to examine the early relationship between existing native cultures and their later responses to European exploration and trade. The textbook readings and related articles will acquaint students not only with the indigenous history, but also with the different methodological approaches used by academics. A minimum of thirty percent of class time will be devoted to discussion of archival evidence (oral history, local history, family history, journals, records, letters, and so on), which may take any or all of the following forms: online discussion forums, in-class group discussion, and critical response essays. Prerequisites: 3 credits in a junior level history or ANTH250

  • NORTH AMERICAN ABORIGINALS

    Course ID: ANTH250

    Name: NORTH AMERICAN ABORIGINALS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides an introduction to the study of the history, cultures, and present concerns of Aboriginal peoples in North America from an anthropological perspective, with a focus on First Nations in Canada. Traditional lifeways and contemporary issues will be discussed through the examination of different culture areas across the continent. PREREQUISITE: 100 level Anthropology

  • ORGANISMS IN THEIR ENVIRONMENT

    Course ID: BIOL102

    Name: ORGANISMS IN THEIR ENVIRONMENT

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed for both Biology majors and non-majors, and explores the principal lineages of organisms on earth: bacteria and archaea, fungi, protists, plants and animals. The relationships of these organisms to their environment and their influence in shaping that environment are examined. Evolutionary pathways and their influence on the diversity of extinct and extant organisms and the classification schemes that we use to distinguish them are discussed. The role that organisms (including humans) have played in the development and maintenance of major ecosystem processes are also studied. This course includes a lab component. PREREQUISITES: 60% in ELA 30-1 and 60% in BIO 30

  • PERSONAL HEALTH & WELLNESS

    Course ID: HEED105

    Name: PERSONAL HEALTH & WELLNESS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course will introduce you to the physical, social, mental, occupational, emotional, environmental and spiritual dimensions of personal health and wellness. These dimensions are described within the context of the Canadian Health Care System and your own individual community. Topics include primary health care, nutrition, exercise, stress management, weight management, eating disorders, common health issues and their prevention. You will be expected to integrate knowledge of the seven dimensions of health and apply this knowledge to a self-analysis of your own health and physical fitness. Finally, you will incorporate change management theory to develop, implement and evaluate a personal wellness plan. The intent of this course is to promote a healthy lifestyle. By examining determinants of health, the current health care system, the seven dimensions of health and applying these concepts to your own lifestyle, you will be better equipped to function as role models and act as change agents for health promotion in your community. Prerequisites: 60% in ENG 30-1

  • PHYSIOLOGY II

    Course ID: BIOL232

    Name: PHYSIOLOGY II

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course focuses on the study of homeostasis and how it is altered by physical, biochemical, microbial or genetic factors, providing an in-depth understanding of the mechanism of human body function, pathophysiology (disordered physiology) and disease processes. The course summarizes the normal function of each organ system and then presents a number of major diseases of each system, showing how symptoms and signs of selected diseases are produced by pathophysiology. This course is designed to prepare students in medical fields of study for advanced courses in their respective fields, as well as other university transfer students. PREREQUISITES: BIOL 230 and BIOL 231

  • INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL & CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

    Course ID: ANTH207

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL & CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is an overview of sociocultural anthropology which introduces the students to the diversity of human cultures and the concepts and theoretical orientation of the cultural anthropologist. Unity and diversity in human social life will be emphasized. PREREQUISITE: 100 level Anthropology

  • SOCIOLOGY OF AGING

    Course ID: SOCI125

    Name: SOCIOLOGY OF AGING

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course will use innovative and exciting methods to allow students to explore the sociological perspective of the aging process of the individual and of the population. It presents aging as a normal life process with the goal of maximizing the life potential of people at all ages. Students will gain a better understanding and appreciation of the social impact of aging in a variety of contexts, mainly focusing on Canadian society. The biological, psychological, and social aspects of aging are explored in addition to the pros and cons of social programs and policies in Canada. The relationship of aging with our economy, health care system, and social programs will be examined in different contexts. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • TECHNOLOGY TOOLS FOR TEACHING & LEARNING

    Course ID: COMA200

    Name: TECHNOLOGY TOOLS FOR TEACHING & LEARNING

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Technology Tools for Teaching and Learning will help prepare students to develop and integrate project-based learning skills into the classroom. Students will examine the Information and Communication Technology Outcomes Program of Studies as published by Alberta Learning, and are expected to develop modules that integrate the ICT Outcomes using the Internet, Word Processing, Spreadsheet, Database, and Multimedia application software. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • THE MODERN WORLD

    Course ID: HIST102

    Name: THE MODERN WORLD

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    History 102 is intended to introduce students both to the content of modern world history and to the study of history at the university level. In content, the course traces the development of the modern world since around 1800. As with any history, the focus of the classes and readings is selective; we cannot hope to cover every society and nation in equal depth, but must attempt to negotiate a balance between specific historical detail and broad themes. In the process, students will be expected to develop and utilise skills needed for history as an academic discipline, such as the ability to remember when things happened and how they fit together, the ability to read historical texts carefully and to ask questions of those texts, and the ability to express themselves clearly and coherently in writing. Ideally, students should come away from this course not simply knowing “facts,” but equipped to think historically about the world in which we live, and armed with skills of critical analysis and expression that they will find applicable to many areas of endeavour aside from history. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART II

    Course ID: ARTH102

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART II

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides an introduction to the history of visual arts and design from 14th Century to the present day. While the course can be taken on its own, it also follows on from ARTH 101, which surveys the history of visual arts and design from the earliest times up to the 14th Century. ARTH 102 starts at a period that is academically considered to be the origin of our modern age, and follows the development of the visual arts to the types of art, design, and architecture that are being created around us in our contemporary world. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

University Transfer Full Course Listing

  • INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY

    Course ID: ANTH101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides a general introduction to anthropology through the study of central concepts and key issues in each of the four fields of anthropology: biological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology as well as archaeology. Human variation, both physical and cultural, will be examined in the context of adaptation and change. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • RACE & RACISM IN THE MODERN WORLD

    Course ID: ANTH103

    Name: RACE & RACISM IN THE MODERN WORLD

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course gives an anthropological perspective on how the concept of race has been used to understand biological and cultural variation among humans. Issues and topics discussed will include multiculturalism, ethnic identity, prejudice, ethnocentrism, racism, eugenics and the persistence of ethnic identity in the face of globalization. Case studies from different parts of the world are used to illustrate these concepts, including current issues of interest in Canada. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL & CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

    Course ID: ANTH207

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL & CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is an overview of sociocultural anthropology which introduces the students to the diversity of human cultures and the concepts and theoretical orientation of the cultural anthropologist. Unity and diversity in human social life will be emphasized. PREREQUISITE: 100 level Anthropology

  • ANTHROPOLOGY OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

    Course ID: ANTH230

    Name: ANTHROPOLOGY OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is an introduction to the anthropological study of science, technology, and environment. It begins with a view of the cultural character of contemporary technology, followed by an examination of the generational and cultural construction of knowledge through science, and finally the exploration of implications for both cultural livelihood and ecological sustainability of science and technology. PREREQUISITE: 100 level Anthropology

  • NORTH AMERICAN ABORIGINALS

    Course ID: ANTH250

    Name: NORTH AMERICAN ABORIGINALS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides an introduction to the study of the history, cultures, and present concerns of Aboriginal peoples in North America from an anthropological perspective, with a focus on First Nations in Canada. Traditional lifeways and contemporary issues will be discussed through the examination of different culture areas across the continent. PREREQUISITE: 100 level Anthropology

  • INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

    Course ID: DEST101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to introduce students to the foundational concepts of development studies and current development trends and issues. The course provides an overview of development studies theories, perspectives, processes, institutions, and actors in a global context. Prerequisites: 60% in ENG 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE STUDIES

    Course ID: NATS101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO NATIVE STUDIES

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course introduces the discipline and expectations in the field of Native Studies, emphasizing the research and writing skills necessary in an academic setting. Course content will come from Aboriginal authors, historical documents and works that have had an impact on Native peoples. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO ABORIGINAL LEGAL ISSUES

    Course ID: NATS201

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO ABORIGINAL LEGAL ISSUES

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to give students an introduction to the development of Native law in Canada. It examines the Canadian legal context for Aboriginal law, identifies sources of Aboriginal law, and discusses Treaty and Aboriginal Rights. It will also look at Indigenous understanding of traditional and customary law and how it is applied within the Canadian system. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • RELIGIONS OF ABORIGINAL NORTH AMERICAS

    Course ID: NATS301

    Name: RELIGIONS OF ABORIGINAL NORTH AMERICAS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    An introduction to the major religious traditions of the past and the present in Native North America. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART I

    Course ID: ARTH101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is an introduction to the history of visual arts and design from the earliest evidence to the fourteenth century. The concentration will be on the history of art in the Near East and Europe: Western Art. Since there has been contact between these areas and the Indian sub-continent and the Far East, and since these have been influences on the later history of Western Art, the art of Asian cultures during this period will also be briefly considered. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART II

    Course ID: ARTH102

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WESTERN ART II

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides an introduction to the history of visual arts and design from 14th Century to the present day. While the course can be taken on its own, it also follows on from ARTH 101, which surveys the history of visual arts and design from the earliest times up to the 14th Century. ARTH 102 starts at a period that is academically considered to be the origin of our modern age, and follows the development of the visual arts to the types of art, design, and architecture that are being created around us in our contemporary world. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • DRAMATIC PROCESS I

    Course ID: DRMA101

    Name: DRAMATIC PROCESS I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    An introduction to the process of acting and dramatic form through the process of improvisation. This workshop-based course will explore speech and movement improvisation with an emphasis on imaginative development and introduction to the process of acting and to dramatic form. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ENG 30-1

  • PLAY ANALYSIS

    Course ID: DRMA102

    Name: PLAY ANALYSIS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    DRMA 102 is an in-depth look into the key elements and concepts of Play Analysis. This course introduces students to a variety of approaches when analyzing plays. It will focus on elements of genre, structure, style, character, theme, language, imagery, and dramatic action, among other topics pertinent to dramatic narrative and structure. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ENG 30-1

  • VISUAL ARTS I - DRAWING

    Course ID: NATA166

    Name: VISUAL ARTS I - DRAWING

    Hours: 75

    Credits: 3

    The focus of this course is on the exploration of a variety of wet & dry drawing materials and the development of basic drawing skills. Students will be introduced to fundamentals including line, shape, volume, value, texture, perspective and composition. This exploration and skill development will be done through observational and imaginative drawing. Prerequisites: none

  • VISUAL ARTS II - PAINTING

    Course ID: NATA167

    Name: VISUAL ARTS II - PAINTING

    Hours: 75

    Credits: 3

    This is an introductory painting course that familiarizes students with a variety of techniques, concepts and processes in painting. The focus will be on using acrylic paint to develop an understanding of color and composition. This will be done through a series of projects that feature a variety of genres, compositional concepts and visual strategies. Prerequisites: none

  • VISUAL ARTS III - PRINTMAKING AND MIXED MEDIA

    Course ID: NATA168

    Name: VISUAL ARTS III - PRINTMAKING AND MIXED MEDIA

    Hours: 75

    Credits: 3

    In this course, students will complete exploration modules in each of the following mediums; printmaking and mixed media compositions. Students will study various printmaking processes with an emphasis on learning basic materials and exploring the potential of this art form. Additionally, students will explore the use of mixed media in primarily 2D compositions. Prerequisites: none

  • VISUAL ARTS IV - SCULPTURE

    Course ID: NATA169

    Name: VISUAL ARTS IV - SCULPTURE

    Hours: 75

    Credits: 3

    In this course, students will complete exploration modules in each of the following mediums; clay and welded metal sculpture. The focus of the clay module will be on basic hand-building kills as well as introductory ceramic concepts including firing and glazing. In the welding module students will be introduced to the use of metal and basic welding techniques and concepts for the creation of art. Prerequisites: none

  • INTRODUCTION TO CELL BIOLOGY

    Course ID: BIOL101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO CELL BIOLOGY

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    This course focuses on the structure and function of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Major topics include the movement of energy, matter and information within and among cells. Key concepts such as cell theory and structure, energy transformations, reproduction, genetic variability, molecular genetics and applications in biotechnology are covered. PREREQUISITES: 60% in ELA 30-1 and 60% in BIO 30

  • ORGANISMS IN THEIR ENVIRONMENT

    Course ID: BIOL102

    Name: ORGANISMS IN THEIR ENVIRONMENT

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed for both Biology majors and non-majors, and explores the principal lineages of organisms on earth: bacteria and archaea, fungi, protists, plants and animals. The relationships of these organisms to their environment and their influence in shaping that environment are examined. Evolutionary pathways and their influence on the diversity of extinct and extant organisms and the classification schemes that we use to distinguish them are discussed. The role that organisms (including humans) have played in the development and maintenance of major ecosystem processes are also studied. This course includes a lab component. PREREQUISITES: 60% in ELA 30-1 and 60% in BIO 30

  • INTRODUCTORY GENETICS

    Course ID: BIOL207

    Name: INTRODUCTORY GENETICS

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    Introductory Genetics. How genes function at chromosomal, molecular, and evolutionary level. How they are repaired, regulated and transmitted. How they regulate development in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. Development of genetics from Mendelian transmission through gene mapping, molecular methods, isolation of individual genes, sequencing, genome projects and beyond. PREREQUISITES: BIOL 101

  • PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY

    Course ID: BIOL208

    Name: PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    Ecology is the scientific study of the interactions between organisms and their environment. This course provides an overview of the limiting factors that influence the living (biotic) components of our ecosystems. Interactions between these biotic components (e.g., competition and predation), population growth, life strategies, and the behaviours of individual organisms are also considered. This course provides general concepts that can stand alone or serve as preparation for advanced ecology courses. Labs complement lecture concepts and include the gathering, analysis, and interpretation of data from ecological experiments and field studies. Prerequisites: Completion of first year NRT or 60% in ELA 30-1 and BIOL 101 or BIO 102

  • HUMAN ANATOMY

    Course ID: BIOL230

    Name: HUMAN ANATOMY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides an in-depth study of the structures of the human body and their interrelationships using a systems approach. The correlations between structure (anatomy) and function (physiology) are examined. Major topics include body organization, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, endocrine, urinary and reproductive systems, the general and special senses, and human development. This course is designed to prepare students in medical fields of study for advanced courses in their respective fields, as well as other university transfer students. PREREQUISITES: 60% in BIO 30 and 60% in ENG 30, BIOL 231

  • PHYSIOLOGY I

    Course ID: BIOL231

    Name: PHYSIOLOGY I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides a study of the overall function of the human body. Major topics include fundamental chemistry, homeostasis, cytology and cell physiology, cell signaling and communication, and muscle, nervous, respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, endocrine, urinary and reproductive physiology, as well as fundamental genetics as it applies to human physiology. This course is designed to prepare students in medical fields of study for advanced courses in their respective fields, as well as other university transfer students. PREREQUISITES: 60% in BIO 30 and 60% in ENG 30-1, BIOL 230

  • PHYSIOLOGY II

    Course ID: BIOL232

    Name: PHYSIOLOGY II

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course focuses on the study of homeostasis and how it is altered by physical, biochemical, microbial or genetic factors, providing an in-depth understanding of the mechanism of human body function, pathophysiology (disordered physiology) and disease processes. The course summarizes the normal function of each organ system and then presents a number of major diseases of each system, showing how symptoms and signs of selected diseases are produced by pathophysiology. This course is designed to prepare students in medical fields of study for advanced courses in their respective fields, as well as other university transfer students. PREREQUISITES: BIOL 230 and BIOL 231

  • INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY I

    Course ID: CHEM101

    Name: INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY I

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    CHEM 101 is an Introductory Chemistry course. It may be referred to as Introductory University Chemistry. This course is designed for both Chemistry majors and non-majors. Key concepts include atomic and molecular structures, states of matter and chemistry of the elements. This course includes a laboratory component designed to provide experience in experimental techniques and accurate measurement. The course prerequisite is a basic knowledge of chemistry equivalent to the Alberta’s Chemistry 30 high school curriculum. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1 and 60% in CHEM 30

  • INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY II

    Course ID: CHEM102

    Name: INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY II

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    CHEM 102 is the second Introductory Chemistry course, following CHEM 101. Therefore, CHEM 101 is the prerequisite course. Major topics include chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, thermodynamics, coordination chemistry and electrochemistry. Key concepts such as reaction rates, rate laws, Arrhenius equation, reaction mechanism and catalysis will be discussed. The course will also present gas-phase equilibria, ICE table and equilibrium calculations, acid-base and complex ion equilibria, solubility and precipitation. In addition, second and third laws of thermodynamics, entropy and spontaneity, coordination compounds, crystal field theory as applied to colour and magnetic properties of coordination compounds, voltaic cells, cell potentials, free energy, electrical work, Nernst equation, batteries, corrosion and electrolysis will be covered. Prerequisite – CHEM 101.

  • ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I

    Course ID: CHEM261

    Name: ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    Structure, bonding, physical properties and reactions of common classes of organic molecules. Discussion will focus on functional groups with emphasis on hydrocarbons and derivatives, alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides and alcohols, infrared spectroscopy, 3-D structures, stereochemistry and mechanisms of addition to double bonds, substitution and elimination reactions. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 101 and CHEM 102

  • ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

    Course ID: CHEM263

    Name: ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    Structure, bonding, physical properties and reactions of common classes of organic molecules. Discussion will focus on functional groups with emphasis on conjugated systems, aromatic compounds, alcohols, ethers, ketones, aldehydes, carboxylic acids and amines. The use of NMR spectroscopy as a tool will be introduced at the beginning and used throughout the course. PREREQUISITE: CHEM 261

  • INTRODUCTION TO EARTH SCIENCES: GEOLOGY & GEOMORPHOLOGY

    Course ID: EASC101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO EARTH SCIENCES: GEOLOGY & GEOMORPHOLOGY

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    EASC101 introduces students to basic concepts of physical geology. Following an introduction to minerals as the basic building blocks of earth materials, igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks are examined. This is followed by a detailed look at earth's internal structure and processes that occur within it. Students are acquainted with the theory of plate tectonics as a unifying concept in geology after which crustal tectonics and resulting deformation structures are explored. Earth surface processes are also examined including weathering, mass movement, surface water movement, glaciations, wind action and desert processes. The final part of the course introduces students to the application of remote sensing and GIS in the earth sciences. PREREQUISITES: Completion of first year NRT or 60% in ENG 30-1 and 60% in BIO 30 or 60% in CHEM 30

  • INTRODUCTION TO EARTH SCIENCES: ATMOSPHERE AND BIOSPHERE

    Course ID: EASC101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO EARTH SCIENCES: ATMOSPHERE AND BIOSPHERE

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    Introduction to the earth’s atmosphere and biosphere including atmospheric and ecological processes affecting weather, climate, vegetation, soils, and ecosystems. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1 and 60% in BIO 30 or 60% in CHEM 30

  • ENVIRONMENT EARTH

    Course ID: EASC205

    Name: ENVIRONMENT EARTH

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides a general introduction to interactions between people and their natural environment, with an emphasis on geological processes. Topics include: soil resources and degradation; earthquakes and volcanoes, streams and flooding; landslides, mass movement and subsidence, shoreline development and coastal processes; surface water and groundwater resources; air and water pollution; waste management and disposal; and global change. Prerequisites: EASC101 or EASC102

  • INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES IN EARTH & ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES

    Course ID: EASC220

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES IN EARTH & ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides an introduction to computational methods and software for earth sciences and human geographers. Lectures emphasize the application of conventional descriptive and inferential analytical methods to spatial problems and their extensions to spatial analysis. Labs provide a hands-on introduction to the department's computer resources. PREREQUISITES: EASC 101 or EASC 102

  • EARTH SURFACE PROCESSES & LANDFORMS

    Course ID: EASC225

    Name: EARTH SURFACE PROCESSES & LANDFORMS

    Hours: 84

    Credits: 3

    Geomorphological processes and landform analysis with special reference to the landscapes of Alberta. Fieldwork required (Site to be chosen during the summer). PREREQUISITES: EASC101 or EASC102

  • INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS I

    Course ID: MATH100

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course serves as an introduction to the methods and applications of single variable calculus. Limits are used to investigate continuity and asymptotes, as well as define the processes of differentiation and integration in a precise manner. Students learn to calculate, interpret, and apply derivatives and integrals to solve rate of change problems and to accurately depict the behavior of a function. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1 and 60% in MATH 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS & RESEARCH METHODS

    Course ID: STAT141

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS & RESEARCH METHODS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This introductory statistics course provides students in a variety of disciplines basic knowledge regarding the theory and application of statistics. Prerequisites: 60% in MATH 30 and 60% in ELA 30-1

  • BUSINESS LAW

    Course ID: BUSL261

    Name: BUSINESS LAW

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    This course presents legal topics relevant to business, including ways to manage common legal risks. An introduction to the Canadian legal system presents sources of law, the court system, the litigation process, and alternatives to litigation. Tort law includes a study of intentional torts, business torts, negligence, and professional liability. Insurance law covers basic concepts of the insurance industry, and how to manage common risks in business. Basic forms of business organizations are delineated, with a focus on the rights and responsibilities of individuals involved in sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations. Contract law details how contracts are created, elements of a binding contract, common contractual issues and defects, how contracts are discharged, and contractual remedies. An overview of the Sale of Goods Act will complete the study of contracts. Employment law describes the employer/employee relationship, the rights and duties of the parties involved, and common issues that may arise in the employment relationship. Intellectual property law discusses how businesses can generate value from ideas and the laws that seek to balance competing business interests. Secured transactions looks at risk assessment and legal obligations of creditors when securing debt and practices that have been developed in the marketplace to manage that risk through security interests and guarantees. PREREQUISITES: ELA 30, ELA 30-1, ELA 30-2, or ELA 33, or COMM 121

  • OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

    Course ID: BUSI222

    Name: OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    Operations management is an ever-changing discipline. New concepts are appearing constantly. Operations management is a key element in improving productivity and creating competitive advantage through productivity growth. This course focuses upon such issues as project management, process analysis and supply chain management. Prerequisite: MATH 118

  • SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

    Course ID: BUSI223

    Name: SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    Almost everyone dreams of starting a business and becoming self-employed. To be a successful entrepreneur, one must know that behind every successful business is a sound business plan. BUSI 223 examines the requirements needed to become a successful entrepreneur. The course focuses on practical ways of thinking and acting in order to develop and build a successful business. The major focus of the course centers on learning to identify the criteria of a successful business plan and developing a comprehensive business plan. Prerequisites: MARK 166 and ACCT 211 and ACCT 107

  • LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

    Course ID: BUSI226

    Name: LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    This course is aimed at providing students with a comprehensive understanding of the skills generally accepted as valuable to leadership. Students will develop these skills through study, participation in class activities, and self-reflection. The course is designed to integrate current leadership theory with practical applications and the student's own leadership journey. Leadership topics include, but are not limited to, the following topics: personal traits and characteristics, mental models, ethics, diversity, organizational culture, mission, vision, and strategy and change. Prerequisites: ORGB 193

  • INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP

    Course ID: ENTR105

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO ENTREPRENEURSHIP

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Entrepreneurship is a Moodle supported course designed to assist students to evaluate the business skills and commitment necessary to successfully operate an entrepreneurial venture. Students will review the challenges and rewards of entrepreneurship. Through assessments and assignments, students will learn about themselves, explore their entrepreneurial idea, and determine how entrepreneurship can play a role in their lives. Additionally, students will be introduced to e-commerce, global and social entrepreneurship. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • MARKETING

    Course ID: MARK166

    Name: MARKETING

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    This is an introductory course covering the fundamental principles and concepts of marketing. Major emphasis is placed on the marketing mix and its strategic application to an increasingly complex business environment. In particular, the areas of product, promotion, price, and distribution are examined as they relate to the achievement of company objectives. Prerequisites: English 30, English 30-1, English 30-2, or English 33 or COMM 121

  • MACROECONOMICS

    Course ID: ECON187

    Name: MACROECONOMICS

    Hours: 64

    Credits: 3

    The overall health of the economy is the prime focus of this course. Gross domestic product, unemployment rates, inflation rates, interest rates, the balance of payments and exchange rates, and the money supply as measures of economic health are studied. This provides a framework for analyzing government monetary and fiscal policies. International economic issues including free trade and foreign investment are also examined. Wherever appropriate, applications to current events are introduced. PREREQUISITES: MATH 30 (Not Math 30-3) or 60% on the Business Math test and ENG 30, strongly recommended ECON 186

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE PROFESSION OF TEACHING

    Course ID: EDUC250

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE PROFESSION OF TEACHING

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course introduces prospective teachers to the complexity of their future professional roles in today’s schools. Students will be encouraged to consider teaching from “the other side of the desk”, and will leave familiar with the intricate framework in which teachers work, and the expectations of various stakeholders. They will gain a knowledge base on which future Education courses will build, and will be introduced to theories of learning and teaching. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY FOR TEACHING

    Course ID: EDPY200

    Name: EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY FOR TEACHING

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course examines the psychology of learning and instruction. The theoretical basis of human development, learning, and teaching will each be explored, providing a comprehensive background to the art of education and effective teaching. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • TECHNOLOGY TOOLS FOR TEACHING & LEARNING

    Course ID: COMA200

    Name: TECHNOLOGY TOOLS FOR TEACHING & LEARNING

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Technology Tools for Teaching and Learning will help prepare students to develop and integrate project-based learning skills into the classroom. Students will examine the Information and Communication Technology Outcomes Program of Studies as published by Alberta Learning, and are expected to develop modules that integrate the ICT Outcomes using the Internet, Word Processing, Spreadsheet, Database, and Multimedia application software. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • HEALTH EDUCATION

    Course ID: HEED105

    Name: HEALTH EDUCATION

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course will introduce you to the physical, social, mental, occupational, emotional, environmental and spiritual dimensions of personal health and wellness. These dimensions are described within the context of the Canadian Health Care System and your own individual community. Topics include primary health care, nutrition, exercise, stress management, weight management, eating disorders, common health issues and their prevention. You will be expected to integrate knowledge of the seven dimensions of health and apply this knowledge to a self-analysis of your own health and physical fitness. Finally, you will incorporate change management theory to develop, implement and evaluate a personal wellness plan. The intent of this course is to promote a healthy lifestyle. By examining determinants of health, the current health care system, the seven dimensions of health and applying these concepts to your own lifestyle, you will be better equipped to function as role models and act as change agents for health promotion in your community. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • HIGHER ARITHMETIC

    Course ID: MATH160

    Name: HIGHER ARITHMETIC

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Math 160 is required for elementary teachers (education majors), critical thinking and problem solving is stressed throughout the course. Conceptual understanding of elementary number theory, set theory, numeration systems and their operations algorithms is the subject of the study; as well as the preparation and presentation of Math Fair. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS

    Course ID: MATH260

    Name: TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Math 260 is an optional course for elementary teachers (education majors), critical thinking and problem solving is stressed throughout the course. Throughout this course, students will explore problem solving through logical thinking and reasoning. Prerequisites: MATH 160

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE MOVEMENT ACTIVITIES TO CHILDREN

    Course ID: PHED200

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE MOVEMENT ACTIVITIES TO CHILDREN

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course explores the study of developmentally appropriate movement activities for children. Students participate in, and work with children in a variety of physical activities in recreational, educational and sport environments. Prerequisite – None.

  • COMMUNICATIONS FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

    Course ID: COMM135

    Name: COMMUNICATIONS FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course explores basic and therapeutic communication skills for the health professional. Communication skills required for the development of caring relationships and to overcome barriers will be discussed, as well as, the skills needed for interprofessional practice, group and family communication. Conflict resolution, self-reflective practice and health teaching are key components of this course. PREREQUISITE: Admission to a Health & Wellness program

  • INTRODUCTORY COMPOSITION

    Course ID: ENGL102

    Name: INTRODUCTORY COMPOSITION

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course helps students to develop the academic writing skills they use throughout their university studies. Students learn to identify good writing, and develop needed research, analytical, and organizational skills. Starting with building good sentences and paragraphs, the essay is the most important genre in this course. By analyzing, summarizing, synthesizing, and critiquing a variety of texts, students learn how to develop their own analyses and arguments with appropriate and correctly documented primary and secondary sources. A review of grammar and sentence structure is a key component of this course. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO PROSE FICTION

    Course ID: ENGL105

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO PROSE FICTION

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    English 105 will introduce students to long and short prose fiction and to the demands of the analytical essay as a means of articulating critical analysis of that fiction. The selected fiction will represent various periods from the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries, and will manifest the voices of writers from: different classes, cultural and ethnic backgrounds, aesthetic and intellectual preoccupations, and geographic places of origin. Classes will include lectures, discussions, writing workshops, and an introduction to literary research methods. The creators of this course also hope that students develop an appreciation for fine literary works. This course is designed primarily for Social Work students. Students will be assessed on their knowledge of the material through tests, essays, and an exam. Students will write two formal analytical essays, and will be graded both on their draft and on their final version. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA & TO POETRY

    Course ID: ENGL106

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA & TO POETRY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    English 106 is designed to teach critical writing, critical reading, and critical thinking while studying canonical literary texts from the sixteenth to the twenty-first centuries. This course combines the study of literary works with instructional texts to teach students to express themselves more clearly in writing and in speech. The creators of this course also hope that students develop an appreciation for fine literary works. This course will present plays and poems from a variety of historical periods and from a variety of cultural contexts. Particular emphasis will be placed on the development of correct writing style, rhetorical skills, and thinking skills required for academic study. A minimum of thirty percent of class time will be devoted to writing instruction, which may take any or all of the following forms: grammar and punctuation instruction, informal writing exercises, writing workshops, stylistic and rhetorical analysis, research skills, peer editing, and group writing projects. The total amount of writing will be no less than 3,000 words. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA & TO POETRY

    Course ID: ENGL106

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA & TO POETRY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    English 106 is designed to teach critical writing, critical reading, and critical thinking while studying canonical literary texts from the sixteenth to the twenty-first centuries. This course combines the study of literary works with instructional texts to teach students to express themselves more clearly in writing and in speech. The creators of this course also hope that students develop an appreciation for fine literary works. This course will present plays and poems from a variety of historical periods and from a variety of cultural contexts. Particular emphasis will be placed on the development of correct writing style, rhetorical skills, and thinking skills required for academic study. A minimum of thirty percent of class time will be devoted to writing instruction, which may take any or all of the following forms: grammar and punctuation instruction, informal writing exercises, writing workshops, stylistic and rhetorical analysis, research skills, peer editing, and group writing projects. The total amount of writing will be no less than 3,000 words. PREREQUISITE: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE NOVEL & THE SHORT STORY

    Course ID: ENGL108

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE NOVEL & THE SHORT STORY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    English 108 is designed to teach critical writing, critical reading, and critical thinking while studying canonical literary texts from the eighteenth to the twentieth-first centuries. This course combines the study of literary works with instructional texts to teach students to express themselves more clearly in writing and in speech. The creators of this course also hope that students develop an appreciation for fine literary works. This course will present novels and short stories from a variety of historical periods, and from a variety of cultural contexts. Particular emphasis will be place of the development of correct writing style, rhetorical skills, and thinking skills required for academic study. A minimum of thirty percent of class time will be devoted to writing instruction, which may take any or all of the following forms: formal written assignments, informal writing exercises, writing workshops, stylistic and rhetorical analysis, research skills, peer editing, group writing projects, and ungraded writing. Students will write two formal essays that will be graded, including an analytical and a research paper. The total amount of writing will be no less than 3,000 words. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or other 3 credit junior English

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE NOVEL & THE SHORT STORY

    Course ID: ENGL108

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE NOVEL & THE SHORT STORY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    English 108 is designed to teach critical writing, critical reading, and critical thinking while studying canonical literary texts from the eighteenth to the twentieth-first centuries. This course combines the study of literary works with instructional texts to teach students to express themselves more clearly in writing and in speech. The creators of this course also hope that students develop an appreciation for fine literary works. This course will present novels and short stories from a variety of historical periods, and from a variety of cultural contexts. Particular emphasis will be place of the development of correct writing style, rhetorical skills, and thinking skills required for academic study. A minimum of thirty percent of class time will be devoted to writing instruction, which may take any or all of the following forms: formal written assignments, informal writing exercises, writing workshops, stylistic and rhetorical analysis, research skills, peer editing, group writing projects, and ungraded writing. Students will write two formal essays that will be graded, including an analytical and a research paper. The total amount of writing will be no less than 3,000 words. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or other 3 credit junior English

  • INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE

    Course ID: ENGL150

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    English 150 will introduce students to important literary works by Canadian English speaking writers, including poetry, short stories, and a novel. Students will also spend some time honing their writing skills. The selected fiction will represent various periods, and will manifest the voices of writers from different classes, cultural and ethnic backgrounds, aesthetic and intellectual preoccupations, and geographic places of origin. Classes will include: lectures, discussions, wiring workshops, and an introduction to literary research methods. The creators of this course also hope that students develop an appreciation for fine literary works. This course is designed primarily for nursing students. Prerequisites: ENGL 106

  • READING HISTORIES: HISTORIES IN TEXTS

    Course ID: ENGL200

    Name: READING HISTORIES: HISTORIES IN TEXTS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    The goals of English 200 are to introduce students to the critical concepts and methods for reading literary texts historically and to emphasize the relationship between representation and history. The course is not necessarily tied to any single historical era or national literature and may range over periods and genres (novels, essays, scholarly criticism, plays, stories, poetry, and film). Topics covered could include Historicism, Representation, and Postmodernism. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 and ENGL 108

  • WRITING FOR THE WORKPLACE

    Course ID: ENGL201

    Name: WRITING FOR THE WORKPLACE

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3



  • READING POLITICS: CLASS & IDEOLOGY

    Course ID: ENGL202

    Name: READING POLITICS: CLASS & IDEOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    The goals of English 202 are to introduce students to the critical concepts and dynamics of class and ideology in literary and other cultural texts. The course, which need not be tied to any one national, literary, or historical period, will include study of novels, stories, poems, essays, historical writing, film, scholarly criticism and theory, drama, journalism and material culture. English 202 will combine the study of selected literary and cultural texts (novels, plays, stories, poems, essays, films, documentaries, historical writing, journalism, and material culture) with scholarly work on the definitions, nature, politics and social function of the concepts of ‘class” and “ideology”. Two essays (one short paper, one longer research paper), a student presentation, class participation and a final exam will determine the final grade. Prerequisites: ENGL 101 & ENGL 102

  • READING POLITICS: RACE & ETHNICITY

    Course ID: ENGL204

    Name: READING POLITICS: RACE & ETHNICITY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    The goals of English 204 are to introduce students to the critical concepts and dynamics of race and ethnicity in literary and other cultural texts. The course need not be tied to any one national literary or historical period and may range over periods and genres (novels, essays, scholarly criticism, plays, stories, poetry, film and material culture). Prerequisites: ENGL 106 and ENGL 108

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE SONNET

    Course ID: ENGL235

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE SONNET

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course introduces the sonnet as a poetic genre. Students will learn how to read and write about poetry by way of exploring the sonnet's variable forms and its subject matters. The genre is used to profess romantic love as well as explore matters of philosophical perplexity like loss of religious faith or the transcending power of the written word. The sonnet comes in regular as well as irregular forms. The course will trace the evolution of the sonnet from its introduction into English by the courtier poets through to its presence in modern times. Exploration of the Petrarchan/Italian and English/Shakespearean sonnet forms shows the evolution of the sonnet's subject matter from complex expression of romantic love, to inspirational love for the divine, and commentary on poetic expression itself. The sonnet also functions as a cultural mirror revealing social attitudes to female body image, gender politics, engagement with both the sacred and profane, as well as a means for broader social criticism. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 and ENGL 108

  • WRITING FOR EDUCATION STUDENTS

    Course ID: ENGL290

    Name: WRITING FOR EDUCATION STUDENTS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    English 290 will introduce students to the values and differences in various forms of academic writing: personal essays, persuasive essays, and expository essays. This writing instruction will be supported by a selection of essays representing various periods, and manifesting voices of writers from different classes, genders, cultural and ethnic backgrounds, aesthetic and intellectual preoccupations, and geographic places of origin. Classes will include lectures, discussions, writing workshops, and an introduction to literary research methods. This course is designed primarily for Education students. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 and ENGL 108

  • SHAKESPEARE

    Course ID: ENGL339

    Name: SHAKESPEARE

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides a University-level introduction to Shakespeare, through the critical reading of nine of Shakespeare’s plays. Many students will have studied one or more Shakespeare’s plays at High School, where the primary concentration is usually on character and plot. This course goes considerably beyond that by looking at a representative cross-section of Shakespeare’s plays, by examining some of the background of the times and cultural background, and by looking at some of the themes that keep recurring in Shakespeare’s plays. The course seeks to show how so many of Shakespeare’s fundamental concerns are as relevant today as they were in 1600, and to help explain why Shakespeare’s plays have had such an impact in so many ages, countries, cultures, and languages. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 and ENGL 108

  • CANADIAN LITERATURE SINCE 1960

    Course ID: ENGL376

    Name: CANADIAN LITERATURE SINCE 1960

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Canadian literature, asserts Northrop Frye in his conclusion to the Literary History of Canada (1965), has been shaped importantly by inheritances of history, language, and place. In particular, Frye positions a specific question—“where is here?”—at the heart of the Canadian literary tradition. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 and ENGL 108

  • CANADIAN LITERATURE TO THE MODERNIST PERIOD

    Course ID: ENGL377

    Name: CANADIAN LITERATURE TO THE MODERNIST PERIOD

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This survey of English Canadian literature to the 1960s will introduce students to two critical questions asked in the formation of our national and literary cultures: ‘Where is here?’ and ‘Who are we here?’. In analyzing reports, letters, poems and short fiction either exploring or representing these questions students will understand how our geography and interaction with place figures in the history of Canadian literature. Reflection of the ‘Canadian’ experience is first that of explorers who traversed our lands seeking to identify its wealth and dimensions. What figures in their works is a physical mapping of ‘Where is here?’ a question latter to be taken up again by colonial settlers who typically asked “Who are we here?” the geographical ‘Where is here?’ and the cultural ‘Who are we here?’ are themes carried forward in to the Modernist period where reflections on colonialism, imperialism, regional literature, and national identity were still at play. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 and ENGL 108

  • MYTH & FOLKLORE: CHILDREN'S LITERATURE

    Course ID: ENGL388

    Name: MYTH & FOLKLORE: CHILDREN'S LITERATURE

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Western English-speaking civilization has deeply imbedded in it myths and folklore drawn from a very wide range of cultures, from the ancient Greek and Roman, to Norse and Arabic legend, from Arthurian legend to pagan religion, from oral folk tales to superstitions and traditional songs. Much children’s literature, particularly novels in a children’s fantasy genre, draws heavily on these traditions, both consciously and unconsciously. Prerequisites: ENGL106 and ENGL108

  • INTRODUCTORY FRENCH I

    Course ID: FREN101

    Name: INTRODUCTORY FRENCH I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    French 101 is the first semester of an introductory French program. This course will help you to learn how to use the French language to communicate about various topics that are relevant to your daily activities, as well as to the realities of the world in which you live. Both classroom activities and major exams will target all four language skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. You will acquire basic grammatical and lexical knowledge that will allow you to carry out a wide-range of communicative tasks. The language learning process will occur within a cultural framework in which you will be introduced to various French-speaking peoples from Europe, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Prerequisites: 60% in FREN 30

  • INTRODUCTORY FRENCH II

    Course ID: FREN102

    Name: INTRODUCTORY FRENCH II

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    French 102 is the second semester of an introductory French program which focuses on the French language and Francophone cultures throughout the world. This course is designed to facilitate the further development of your communication skills in French and to give you a balance of all four language skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. By the end of the semester, you will be able to initiate and sustain interactions in French, understand the main ideas of what you hear, see, and read in French, and express yourself clearly in written French. In addition to acquiring intermediate-level grammatical and linguistic knowledge, you will also gain a deeper understanding of diverse aspects of French-speaking cultures. Prerequisites: FREN 101

  • INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

    Course ID: RUSS211

    Name: INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

  • INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II

    Course ID: RUSS212

    Name: INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

  • READING RUSSIAN I

    Course ID: RUSS325

    Name: READING RUSSIAN I

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

  • READING RUSSIAN II

    Course ID: RUSS326

    Name: READING RUSSIAN II

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

  • THE EARLY MODERN WORLD

    Course ID: HIST101

    Name: THE EARLY MODERN WORLD

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    History 101 is intended to introduce students both to the content of early modern world history and to the study of history at the university level. In content, the course traces the development of the world from around 1400 to around 1800. As with any history, the focus of the classes and readings is selective; we cannot hope to cover every society and nation in equal depth, but must attempt to negotiate a balance between specific historical detail and broad themes. In the process, students will be expected to develop and utilise skills needed for history as an academic discipline, such as the ability to remember when things happened and how they fit together, the ability to read historical texts carefully and to ask questions of those texts, and the ability to express themselves clearly and coherently in writing. Ideally, students should come away from this course not simply knowing “facts,” but equipped to think historically about the world in which we live, and armed with skills of critical analysis and expression that they will find applicable to many areas of endeavour aside from history. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • THE MODERN WORLD

    Course ID: HIST102

    Name: THE MODERN WORLD

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    History 102 is intended to introduce students both to the content of modern world history and to the study of history at the university level. In content, the course traces the development of the modern world since around 1800. As with any history, the focus of the classes and readings is selective; we cannot hope to cover every society and nation in equal depth, but must attempt to negotiate a balance between specific historical detail and broad themes. In the process, students will be expected to develop and utilise skills needed for history as an academic discipline, such as the ability to remember when things happened and how they fit together, the ability to read historical texts carefully and to ask questions of those texts, and the ability to express themselves clearly and coherently in writing. Ideally, students should come away from this course not simply knowing “facts,” but equipped to think historically about the world in which we live, and armed with skills of critical analysis and expression that they will find applicable to many areas of endeavour aside from history. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF CANADIAN HISTORY, 1500-1867

    Course ID: HIST210

    Name: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF CANADIAN HISTORY, 1500-1867

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course will provide an introductory survey of Canadian history from roughly 1500 to 1867. Some of the major themes to be discussed will include: Aboriginal-European contact; the fur trade; New France; and the expansion of white settlements. In addition, key concepts and methods of history as a discipline will be reviewed. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF CANADIAN HISTORY: CONFEDERATION TO THE PRESENT

    Course ID: HIST211

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF CANADIAN HISTORY: CONFEDERATION TO THE PRESENT

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course will provide an introductory survey of Canadian history from 1867 to the present. Among the major themes discussed will be nationalism, industrialization, urbanization, and cultural change. In addition, key concepts and methods of history as a discipline will be reviewed. Prerequisites: 60% in ENG 30-1

  • EUROPE IN NINETEENTH and TWENTIETH CENTURY

    Course ID: HIST212

    Name: EUROPE IN NINETEENTH and TWENTIETH CENTURY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This lecture-based course examines the social and political aspects of European history form the time of the French Revolution to 1945. It surveys the internal development of European empires and the establishment of European nation-states, and analyses social and political interaction between them. It also follows the process of boundary changes throughout Europe from the late 1800s to the end of the Second World War. Prerequisites: HIST 101 or HIST 102

  • AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF AMERICAN HISTORY 1500-1865

    Course ID: HIST250

    Name: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF AMERICAN HISTORY 1500-1865

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course will provide an introductory survey of American history from 1500 to 1865. The main political, economic, and social aspects of American life during this period will be examined. Among the major themes discussed will be Indian-White contact, colonial and revolutionary America, westward expansion, slavery, and the Civil War. When combined with History 251 this course will provide a complete survey of U. S. history and a basis for future study in the area. Prerequisites: HIST 101 or HIST 102

  • AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1865

    Course ID: HIST251

    Name: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1865

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course will provide an introductory survey of American history since 1865. The main political, economic, and social aspects of American life during this period will be examined. Among the major themes discussed will be race relations, industrialization, urbanization, and U. S. foreign policy. When combined with History 250 this course will provide a complete survey of U. S. history and a basis for future study in the area. Prerequisites: HIST 101 or HIST 102

  • 20TH CENTURY WARFARE

    Course ID: HIST295

    Name: 20TH CENTURY WARFARE

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This lecture-based course will examine a history of modern warfare and analyze motives behind various wars, as well as internal dynamic of specific military confrontations and their social impact on society. It will also critically evaluate the outcome of numerous local and regional military conflicts and the two World Wars, as well as local and regional conflicts that arose in the last decades of the twentieth century. Prerequisites: HIST 101 or HIST 102

  • SECOND WORLD WAR

    Course ID: HIST296

    Name: SECOND WORLD WAR

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This lecture-based course surveys the entire history of the Second World War, from 1939 until 1945, in all of its theatres. Aside from the military aspect of the conflict, students will gain an insight into the changes of political, economic and social conditions, which led to this global war. The course objective is to provide a comprehensive account of economic, political and social conditions that led to the war and to analyze military actions of the warring parties, as well as to provide a critical assessment of the role of ideology in reshaping the European political landscape of the period. Students will learn about the nature of Italian Fascism and German National Socialism. The lectures will emphasize political, social and economic questions relevant to the pre-Second World War situation and examine these issues in the course of the conflict. The textbook assigned provides excellent coverage of the military aspects of the conflict, while lectures and special presentations (documentary films dealing with specific events in the war) will offer a more comprehensive portraying of the WW II. The point is to gain an overall picture of various aspects of the war, and the larger issues arising from it. Prerequisites: HIST 101 or HIST 102

  • RUSSIA IN THE 20TH CENTURY

    Course ID: HIST311

    Name: RUSSIA IN THE 20TH CENTURY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    An historical survey of domestic and foreign policy, from Nicholas II to Yeltsin. The objective of this course is to provide a survey of the Russian and Soviet history in the twentieth century and to introduce students to major issues, ideas, and personalities that molded this period. This course will present the history of the Soviet Union as a great experiment, and as an attempt to build an ideal, just society. We will pay special attention to social and cultural changes after the revolution. The course will teach the critical approach to historical sources, as well as other skills required for articulating and evaluating historical arguments. Prerequisites: HIST 101 OR HIST 102

  • HISTORY OF THE NATIVE PEOPLES OF CANADA TO 1867

    Course ID: HIST368

    Name: HISTORY OF THE NATIVE PEOPLES OF CANADA TO 1867

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    History 368 is a lecture and seminar course that examines the history of the indigenous peoples of Canada prior to and at the moment of first contact with European peoples. In order to gain a full perspective of this critical time period in the North American history, students examine a variety of oral and written documents produced by First Nations, Métis, Aboriginal, and Inuit peoples as well as European explorers, traders and settlers. A combination of lectures and seminar groups are used to examine the early relationship between existing native cultures and their later responses to European exploration and trade. The textbook readings and related articles will acquaint students not only with the indigenous history, but also with the different methodological approaches used by academics. A minimum of thirty percent of class time will be devoted to discussion of archival evidence (oral history, local history, family history, journals, records, letters, and so on), which may take any or all of the following forms: online discussion forums, in-class group discussion, and critical response essays. Prerequisites: 3 credits in a junior level history or ANTH250

  • INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

    Course ID: PSYC101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is a general survey course providing the student with an understanding of the basic concepts and techniques of modern psychology as a behavioural science. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY

    Course ID: PSYC104

    Name: INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is intended to inspire an interest in, and an appreciation for, the field of psychology. Topics in this course include the history of psychological science, psychological research methods, the structure and function of the brain and nervous system, learning, sensation, perception, memory, consciousness, thought and language. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INDIVIDUAL & SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR

    Course ID: PSYC105

    Name: INDIVIDUAL & SOCIAL BEHAVIOUR

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is the second half of the Introductory Psychology course sequence. It will cover such topics as human intellect, human development from birth to old age, motivation, emotion, personality, social psychological processes, stress and health, as well as mental disorders and their treatments. This course is an overview of these diverse topics, most of which can be studied in one or more complete courses. Prerequisites: PSYC104

  • DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Course ID: PSYC202

    Name: DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course explores the development of the person through the stages of infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and death. Each stage of human development will be studied from a physical, cognitive, and psychosocial perspective. The course will include developmental influences related to family systems and culture. Prerequisites: PSYC104

  • PERSONALITY

    Course ID: PSYC233

    Name: PERSONALITY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course involves an introduction to the primary perspectives of personality development, the theories and theorists, and their supporting research. The major perspectives which will be studied include: psychoanalytic, neoanalytic, phenomenological, learning, cognitive, dispositional, and biological. A number of alternative theories within these perspectives will also be examined and compared. The concepts of personality development emerging from psychological research and theory will be emphasized. Prerequisites: PSYC104

  • SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Course ID: PSYC241

    Name: SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Social Psychology is the scientific study of the way people’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviours are influenced by the real or imagined presence of other people. This course examines the predominant theories and research on individuals in a social context. Specific topics that are discussed include: understanding ourselves in relation to our social world, the self-concept, impression formation and management, attitudes and attitude change, interpersonal attraction, altruism, aggression, conformity, group dynamics, prejudice, and social psychology’s role in health, the environment, and the law. Prerequisites: PSYC104

  • BRAIN & BEHAVIOUR

    Course ID: PSYC275

    Name: BRAIN & BEHAVIOUR

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the area of biological psychology. Its focus is on the scientific study of the biological bases of human and animal behaviour with a biological approach to the study of psychology. Topics that will be covered in this course include: evolution, neuroanatomy and neurophysiology – the study of the structure and functions and activities of the nervous system, neuropharmacology – the study of the effects of drugs on neural activity, the physiological mechanisms involved in sensation, perception, movement, motivation, emotion, learning, and communication. Prerequisites: PSYC 104 and 60% in BIO 30

  • PRINCIPLES OF BEHAVIOR

    Course ID: PSYC281

    Name: PRINCIPLES OF BEHAVIOR

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the branch of psychology that deals with how people and animals learn and how their behaviours are later changed as a result of this learning. It will provide the student with an introduction to behaviour change techniques and will examine how circumstances in the environment affect the behaviour of people and animals. Discussions will address basic issues in the field of learning and behaviour including: innate behaviour processes, classical and operant conditioning, experimental methodologies, critical scientific thinking skills and scientific writing. Prerequisites: PSYC104

  • ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Course ID: PSYC285

    Name: ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides an overview of a variety of abnormal behaviours that are psychologically oriented. The characteristics and observable symptoms of psychological disorders are studied including various theoretical orientations, treatment methods, cultural, age and gender differences, and various factors related to the incidence of mental disorders. The learning in this course adds to the knowledge students acquired in Introductory Psychology and, for CSW students, Developmental Psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 104 and PSYC 202, or PSYC 105

  • INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

    Course ID: SOCI101

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to introduce students to the discipline of Sociology and current sociological trends and issues. The course provides an overview of sociological concepts, perspectives, processes and institutions in a Canadian context with particular emphasis on various issues impacting Canadian society. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • SOCIAL PROBLEMS

    Course ID: SOCI102

    Name: SOCIAL PROBLEMS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    SOCI 102 is an in-depth look into social problems within Canada and around the world. An understanding is gained by using different theoretical concepts applied to particular social problems. The topics include health care, drugs, crime, family, gender and racial inequality, poverty, unemployment, education, war and terrorism, science and technology and population. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • SOCIOLOGY OF AGING

    Course ID: SOCI125

    Name: SOCIOLOGY OF AGING

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course will use innovative and exciting methods to allow students to explore the sociological perspective of the aging process of the individual and of the population. It presents aging as a normal life process with the goal of maximizing the life potential of people at all ages. Students will gain a better understanding and appreciation of the social impact of aging in a variety of contexts, mainly focusing on Canadian society. The biological, psychological, and social aspects of aging are explored in addition to the pros and cons of social programs and policies in Canada. The relationship of aging with our economy, health care system, and social programs will be examined in different contexts. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANCE AND CONFORMITY

    Course ID: SOCI224

    Name: SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANCE AND CONFORMITY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    An in-depth look into crime and deviance in society, looking at specific schools of thought regarding deviance and conformity within society. A historical overview included with modern ideas of crime and criminality will round out a picture of deviance and crime in contemporary society. The course will focus on such behaviours as homicide, drug use, prostitution, gangs, mental illness, and sexuality. Prerequisites: SOCI 101

  • CRIMINOLOGY

    Course ID: SOCI225

    Name: CRIMINOLOGY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Criminology is the exploration and explanation of general patterns of law breaking behaviours. A basic understanding of the sociological study of crime will be provided by analyzing such topics as domestic and international terrorism, serial homicide, cyber-crime, organized and white-collar crime. A discussion of how crime is measured will also be provided. Prerequisites: SOCI 101

  • INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

    Course ID: SOCI269

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBALIZATION

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Introduction to Globalization is an in-depth study of globalization and its effects on the modern world. An historical perspective into the evolution of societies helps to understand the global spread of technology, food consumption, and production. A wide range of topics is considered for discussion including debt, corporations, women, the United States, terror and power and world culture. Prerequisites: SOCI 101

  • INTRODUCTION TO THE FAMILY

    Course ID: SOCI271

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO THE FAMILY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    An introduction to the concepts of family and marriage focusing on major issues developed with regard to parenting, working family life, poverty, dysfunction, and types of families. A Canadian approach will aid in focusing issues nationally, while looking to global representation for comparison. Prerequisites: SOCI 101

  • CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION

    Course ID: SOCI327

    Name: CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course provides an overview of the criminal justice system and its sub-components, providing a sociological perspective with empirical research to understand the historical and current issues surrounding criminal justice in Canada. Prerequisites: SOCI 225

  • INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS

    Course ID: FMST210

    Name: INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course will examine the sociological, psychological, and personal factors affecting the development, maintenance, and dissolution of intimate relationships today. Prerequisite: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • HUMAN SEXUALITY

    Course ID: FMST211

    Name: HUMAN SEXUALITY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course will provide an overview of issues in human sexuality. It will examine sexual beliefs and behaviours at the personal, familial and societal levels. The course will include instructor and special guest lectures, course readings, and assignments. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • VALUES AND SOCIETY

    Course ID: PHIL101

    Name: VALUES AND SOCIETY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is an introduction to various problems concerning human value and the social world. Through the examination of several classic and contemporary readings, the course will familiarize students with several philosophical issues including: What is the good life? Does religion give my life meaning? Does God exist? What is the nature of the self? What is the meaning of death? Is there such a thing as a just war? What is the meaning of justice? What role do emotions play in my life? What is the right thing to do? Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • KNOWLEDGE AND REALITY

    Course ID: PHIL102

    Name: KNOWLEDGE AND REALITY

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is an introduction to classic problems in philosophy. The focus for this course will be problems in critical thinking, epistemology (theory of knowledge), philosophy of mind, and philosophy of religion. To understand historical and contemporary approaches to traditional philosophical problems. To learn to formulate and express ideas clearly and carefully. To understand what is to think critically and objectively about issues which may be emotionally charged and controversial. To help students appreciate the experience of close and careful examination of philosophical texts. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

    Course ID: PHIL355

    Name: PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course will examine the philosophical dimensions of human relationships with the environment and the natural world. Topics will include: Environmental Ethics, Intrinsic and Extrinsic Value, Humans and Animals, Deep Ecology, Eco-Feminism, Preservation, Population and Hunger, Pollution, and Traditional and Non-Western Environmental Philosophy. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • EQUALITY & SOCIAL JUSTICE

    Course ID: PHIL368

    Name: EQUALITY & SOCIAL JUSTICE

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Philosophy 368 is essentially designed to introduce students to major theories of justice in social and political philosophy. More specifically, it seeks to familiarize students with the theoretical and practical problems involved in debates regarding equality and social justice. The first part of the course is intended to provide a historical overview of some of the main lines of thinking in social and political philosophy. Students will ponder the divergent traditions and orientations of social and political thought with some emphasis on their historical context. While the primary focus of the first part will be on understanding some “classical” philosophers in their historical contexts and their distinctive approaches to justice and equality, some interpretive essays will be used to appreciate how these historical figures and their writings continue to shape contemporary debate regarding equality and social justice. The second part basically focuses on current problems in equality and justice more directly. Students will be introduced to some of the prominent recent works in social and political philosophy and the analytical methods they employ. Students should come away from this course equipped with the theoretical and conceptual tools indispensable for the understanding and analysis of social justice in contemporary societies. As well, students will be encouraged to critically assess and develop their own views about the different contentious issues. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS

    Course ID: RELI102

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Through this course it is hoped that students will develop an understanding of and appreciation for the religious diversity of the human community. We shall explore both historical elements and the modern ways religions work in everyday life. Though emphasis is on major world religions, new religious movements and less established traditions are also explored. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO EASTERN RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS

    Course ID: RELI103

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO EASTERN RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    Students will develop an understanding of and appreciation for the religious diversity of the human community. Students will explore eastern traditions in their nascent and historical forms, and learn how those traditions have been adapted into modern-day practices. In exploring eastern traditions, students will also begin to understand the religious studies discipline more generally, encountering the major scholars, methodologies, and debates that animate the field. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES

    Course ID: WMST201

    Name: INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of women and issues important to women. This course is a prerequisite for other women’s studies classes and will provide you with the theoretical foundations necessary for understanding women’s issues. The concept of gender will be explored as a critical category in relation to race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, and culture. Social institutions such as education, family, work, health, sexuality, religion, and politics will be explored through the course readings, presentations and in-class discussions. Prerequisites: 60% in ELA 30-1

  • WOMEN & WORK

    Course ID: WMST305

    Name: WOMEN & WORK

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course will examine women’s experiences today and historically in the work force. The interplay between paid and non-paid work will be explored as it relates to women’s position in society. Issues such as sexual harassment, divorce, parenting, and other factors that affect women’s ability to work will be investigated through course readings, lectures, and presentations. Lastly, issues relating to the influence of diversity (race, class, disability, sexual orientation, etc.) on work will be discussed. Prerequisites: WMST 201

  • WOMEN & HEALTH

    Course ID: WMST321

    Name: WOMEN & HEALTH

    Hours: 45

    Credits: 3

    This course offers a feminist analysis of women’s health. This course uses a broad definition of health and recognizes that a diversity of issues such as race, culture, age, disability, and sexual orientation have an impact on women’s health. This course includes an overview of topics such as women’s bodies and body image, sexuality and reproductive health, the politics of health care, and special topics such as cancer, aging, and violence. Prerequisites: WMST 201

Stay Connected

 

Disclaimer
Privacy Policy